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KNOW ABOUT ECTOPIC PREGNANCY BEFORE CONCIEVING

By MomMed | 20 October 2022 | 0 Comments



WHAT IS A PREGNANCY?

Your ovaries discharge an egg into a fallopian tube every month. The egg then passes through the fallopian tubule and deposits in the uterine wall. Without pregnancy, your uterine lining sheds and you get your period.

Fertilized eggs embed in the uterine wall and mature into fetuses. Pregnancy needs several physical changes, from conception through delivery. Fertilized egg attachment is one of these processes.

 

WHAT IS AN ECTOPIC PREGNANCY?

Ectopic pregnancy is an unusual form of pregnancy, also called as fallopian or tubal/tube pregnancy. The fertilized egg doesn't attach to the uterus in ectopic pregnancy. It connects to the fallopian tube, abdomen, or cervix.

A pregnancy test may show a woman is pregnant, but a fertilized egg can't develop outside the uterus. According to studies, one in fifty pregnancies is ectopic (20 out of 1,000). 1 in 90 UK pregnancies is ectopic which means 11,000 pregnancies a year.

Untreated ectopic pregnancy may be life-threatening. Prompt treatment minimizes ectopic pregnancy problems, enhances chances for future healthy pregnancies, plus reduces future health issues. In 2% of pregnancies, a fertilized egg implants inside a fallopian tube.

Ectopic pregnancies occur before some women know they're pregnant. It needs immediate care. An ectopic pregnancy may lead to life internal bleeding as it progresses. However, you can achieve a healthy pregnancy with a quick diagnosis and treatment.

 

WHAT HAPPENS IN AN ECTOPIC PREGNANCY?

When a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus, it can't develop properly. Ectopic pregnancies affect 2% of pregnancies. More than 90% of ectopic pregnancies develop in the fallopian tubes, although they may also occur in the cervix, ovary, or abdomen.

Untreated ectopic pregnancy may burst a fallopian tube and cause serious bleeding. Ectopic pregnancies don't progress properly. Fertilized eggs can't survive, and developing tissue may cause lasting hemorrhage. If you suspect ectopic pregnancy, contact your doctor immediately.


POINTS TO REMEMBER:

1. Fallopian ectopic pregnancy is also called a tubal pregnancy.

2. 80 percent of the total ectopic pregnancies are ampullary (middle fallopian tube).

3. Isthmic (upper fallopian tube near uterus) comprises 12% of ectopic pregnancies.

4. Fimbrial (tube end) comprises 5% of ectopic pregnancies.

5. The tube's delicate structure of cilia and mucus-producing cells propels a fertilized ovum to the uterus to implant in four days.

6. Sometimes embryo transfer is sluggish, either due to fallopian tube inflammation or infection or for no evident reason it may implant within fallopian tube.

7. Most ectopic pregnancies arise in the fallopian tube.

8. Tuberculoma pregnancy is fatal.

9. Fallopian tube ectopic pregnancy is common. An ovarian or abdominal ectopic pregnancy is uncommon.

10. An ectopic pregnancy may be deadly for the mother if it’s not treated immediately.

 

WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT IN AN ECTOPIC PREGNANCY?

Ectopic Pregnancies commonly end within days. First-trimester discomfort and bleeding indicate ectopic pregnancy, a life-threatening illness. This probably happens in 50% of ectopic pregnancies.

You may have had no pregnancy symptoms. Sometimes there's agony and bleeding like a miscarriage. This requires no action. Pregnancy may grow in the Fallopian tube. This may create tube problems.

The Fallopian tube can hardly expand. If the pregnancy continues, the Fallopian tube ruptures causing, internal hemorrhage and discomforts that result in a medical emergency.

Fertilized egg implants outside the womb, generally in a fallopian tube. The embryo can't grow because the fallopian tube is too small. In some circumstances, an ectopic pregnancy produces no symptoms and is discovered through normal testing.

Most women have symptoms between weeks 4 and 12 of pregnancy. Early diagnosis and treatment may avoid life-threatening hemorrhage and salvage the tube, if feasible.

 

WHAT CAUSES AN ECTOPIC PREGNANCY?

Damaged fallopian tubes from surgery or infection, smoking, and assisted reproduction may cause ectopic pregnancy. Ectopic pregnancies may occur in women without risk factors.


DETECTION OF AN ECTOPIC PREGNANCY:

Transvaginal ultrasound, hCG levels, and occasionally uterine curettage may detect at-risk women quickly. The absence of intrauterine pregnancy above a cut point of hCG indicates an abnormal pregnancy but does not differentiate a miscarriage from an ectopic pregnancy.

Serial hCG levels may be used to assess whether a low initial hCG value indicates a viable pregnancy or spontaneous abortion. A viable pregnancy needs a 53% hCG increase in 2 days.

Depending on the starting level, spontaneous abortions fall 21–35% in 2 days. A slower serial hCG increase or decline suggests ectopic pregnancy. Unruptured ectopic pregnancies may be treated with methotrexate.

Methotrexate intramuscular injection may safely cure an ectopic pregnancy with equal success, tubal patency, and future fertility as conservative surgery. Methotrexate success rates are negatively related to baseline hCG levels and greater with multidose regimens.


IS ECTOPIC PREGNANCY PREVENTABLE?

Ectopic pregnancies are unavoidable but you can reduce your risk.

1. Limiting sexual partners and wearing a condom helps avoid STDs and pelvic inflammatory illness.

2. No smoking! Quit before trying to conceive.

3. Good living practices may lower risk factors.

4. Keeping a healthy weight and diet.

5. Before attempting to conceive, discuss risk factors with your doctor.

 

ECTOPIC PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONS:

If you had surgery, you're more prone to have fertility difficulties and ectopic pregnancies than if you received medical therapy or no treatment. You have a 6 in 10 probability of having a normal pregnancy even if 1 Fallopian tube is removed.

(Another Fallopian tube works.) 1-2% of future pregnancies may be ectopic. If you've experienced an ectopic pregnancy, consult your doctor earlier in future pregnancies.

 

CONCLUSION AND SOLUTION:

After an ectopic pregnancy, women frequently wonder whether they can have a normal pregnancy. If you had no fertility difficulties or Fallopian tube disorders before an ectopic pregnancy, your fertility won't be harmed, and you shouldn't have a higher risk of having another one.

Post-treatment anxiety and depression are prevalent. Normal concerns include future ectopic pregnancies, fertility, and loss of the pregnancy. Discuss these and any post-treatment issues with your doctor.

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